Category Archives: Truckee

Tahoe Donner golf course opens to the public May 15, 2015

Leave a comment

Tahoe Donner‘s golf course opens to the public on May 15, 2015 (conditions permitting), and the driving range opens April 17. The course at Tahoe Donner is considered by many as “the premier mountain course in Truckee-Tahoe with incredible views and the best greens.”

To learn more or purchase season passes and multi-plan packs, visit TahoeDonner.com.

Truckee named one of “America’s 20 Coolest Outdoor Towns”

Leave a comment

Matador Network named Truckee one of their “America’s 20 Coolest Outdoor Towns.”

“THIS LIST COULD EASILY HAVE 100 PLACES. The US simply has so many canyons and rivers and slopes, so much coastline, all of it with rad little towns along the way.

“So putting together this list, we narrowed it down with a few criteria:

“1. The place should be an actual town, not just a spot or destination. In other words, you can live/work there year round, and even in the “off-season” it’s still cool.

“2. The outdoor objectives that make the place so rad must be part of the immediate surroundings. If you can’t climb / ski / paddle / surf right in town, the access should be just beyond, not an hour away.

“3. The place should have a notable culture, tradition, or local economy around the activities (and natural resources) themselves. Of special mention are places such as Salida, where actual infrastructure has been developed (manmade whitewater features) that brings cool events and awareness to the town.

“For obvious reasons, we came back with a high concentration of places out West (and in Hawaii/Alaska). May not be fair, but if you visit you’ll understand.

“All this said, finding big lines can happen anywhere. Where I grew up in the southern Piedmont (forested, gentle rolling hills kind of terrain), a trickling neighborhood ditch became a gnarly class V kayak run if you caught it right after a thunderstorm.

“The ultimate limitation is never the place but your imagination. Let us know the what kinds of lines you’re finding right in your town.

9. Truckee, CA

Perfect day

“Anything multi-sport springtime: Ski corn, downhill or cross-country mountain bike up Western States or Martis Peak and then wrap up the day with a fly-fishing session on the Little Truckee as the dry flies start popping. Maybe even a surf strike mission to SF if you can squeeze it in. Get a quick climb in up on Donner Summit at Snowshed or Blackwall…just to round it out.

Honor roll

“Beers: A cooler by the river or at the Chamoix if you can make it before the sun goes behind tram face
“Coffee: Coffee Bar on Jibboom or Wildflour in Squaw
“Eats: Tacos Jalisco, or next door at Treat Box for a burger
“Gear: The Backcountry, Tahoe Sports Hub, Start Haus does a great tune
“Music venue: Moody’s

“Special thanks: Tucker Patton.”

Read the full article, here.

(Source: Matador Network; Photo: Jeff Engerbretson/Squaw Valley)

Boreal Mountain Resort’s 50th season open through this weekend

Leave a comment

Celebrate the Final Day of Boreal Mountain Resort‘s 50th Season this Sunday, April 12, 2015 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Saturday, April 11th, join them for Armada Spring Meltdown. The event will bring together freeski pro and amateurs in one last celebrate-the-spring hooray. Enjoy the sunshine and the chance to win some sweet prizes.

Check out Woodward Tahoe’s Dawn Till Dusk:

Truckee snowboarder Mike Basich’s tiny home

Leave a comment

“A professional snowboarder in California figured out a genius way to get closer to the slopes. Mike Basich built this tiny 225-square-foot home in the middle of his 40-acre property near Truckee, Calif. He told Laura Ling from “Going off the Grid” about how he built his new digs by hand. “It took me five years — two and half years to do all the rock work. I think I moved about 175 ton of rock.”

“Not only is the little house off the beaten path, it’s also off the grid. That means no Internet, no indoor plumbing, and no traditional electricity. Luckily for anyone wanting to take a shower or wash their hands, the property has two creeks that provide water for the home. The best part for Basich is the location. Not only can he snowboard on private trails, but the property even has its own chair lift that Basich built with the help of some friends. If you think this style of living is crazy, Basich is one of 180,000 Americans choosing to live off the grid. He says of the home, “I like to think of it as getting back to the basics of humanity. I like feeling connected to the earth more than I could with a 4,000-square-foot house.”

(Source: Yahoo!News)

New York Times Travel promotes Truckee restaurants, Boreal Mountain Resort and Donner Memorial State Park

Leave a comment

The New York Times Travel regular 36 Hours feature is promoting Truckee restaurants, Boreal Mountain Resort and the Donner Memorial State Park today.

36 Hours | What to Do in Lake Tahoe

“Straddling the Nevada-California border, Lake Tahoe’s immense cobalt blue oval — unfrozen thanks to the lake’s depth — stands out against the snow-covered mountains like a colossal eye staring into heaven. This May, Tahoe’s wilderness will be even more accessible with JetBlue beginning daily direct flights between J.F.K. and Reno-Tahoe International Airport. The lake’s vastness can be absorbed only by being there — or better yet, skiing the dozen resorts surrounding it, their trails like frozen white waterfalls cutting through the fir-lined mountains. Lake Tahoe has two distinctive areas: the north side, where cowboy-chic cabins and semi-isolated shops and cafes overlook a quiet shoreline; and South Tahoe, which glitters with casinos, clubs and a slew of new upscale boutique hotels hovering above the lake. Skiing both sides in one weekend is an ambitious undertaking, but the lake’s wilderness spirit and surprising contrasts are compelling enough to pull you into its adventurous orbit.

“Friday

“1. History Lesson | 3 p.m.

“Winter is a dramatic time to visit Donner Memorial State Park ($8 entry per vehicle) for a bracing insight into the travails of the 87 members of the Donner Party who were snowed in here during the winter of 1846-47 and resorted to cannibalism to survive. The Visitor’s Center gives a grim but inspiring overview of what Donner & Co. went though in their drive to overcome the High Sierras. It’s an especially touching and surreal experience to stand by the boulder that formed the wall of one of the party’s cabins with the nearby roar of Highway 80 drivers clearing the once-daunting Donner Pass in minutes.

“2. Trampolines and Tubing | 4:30 p.m.

“Beloved by the local younger set for its intimate slopes, night skiing and Camp Woodward year-round indoor training facility (trampolines! foam pits!), Boreal, perched on a scenic stretch of Donner Pass, is now celebrating its 50th year. Because of its five terrain parks, including the newly opened pirate-themed Neffland, Boreal is especially attractive to snowboarders, having hosted the United States Snowboarding Grand Prix in 2009. Boreal lights up its mile-long runs for night skiing, 3:30 to 9 p.m. Take the lift to 7,300 feet and wait for the stars to emerge above while carving through the fir trees back to the valley. You can also take the hills closer to ground on the dedicated snow-tubing park next to the parking lot (night lift ticket $29 or two-hour tubing session $34). Night skiers also have another great opportunity on Saturday when Squaw Valley, half an hour’s drive south on the Lake, illuminates its long runs with a new high contrast lighting system. (3 to 7 p.m. Lift tickets, $49)

“3. Truckin’ the North Shore | 7:30 p.m.

“The old railroad town of Truckee, with its upscale hippie vibe, is the cultural and night-life nexus of the North Shore. For a rustic overview of this colorful town, tuck into Cottonwood Restaurant, a cozy spot perched cliffside above the Truckee River. The restaurant’s giant garlic romaine Caesar salad has become a local institution. Dinner for two around $65. For true epicures, there’s Trokay restaurant on Truckee’s main drag where the chef, John Weatherson, has found his haven from the Michelin-starred Restaurant Daniel in New York. For the last four years he and his wife, Nyna, have pioneered French-inspired, locally sourced cuisine such as venison with sunchoke, or green apple granita with celery, pomegranate and, yes, snow. A prix fixe dinner with wine pairing starts at $125. Still awake? Wander a block north into the cross hairs of Truckee night life: Moody’s Bistro Bar and Beats, in a cozy niche of the Victorian-era Truckee Hotel. The hotel is a creaky-planked affair that incongruously adjoins the sleek, hip, jazzy bar that could just as well be in Paris. Belly up for the smooth barrel-aged Negroni ($14) or hot-buttered rum from house-made ingredients ($9) to go with the colorful whatever-happens-happens local musical acts — Paul McCartney, a regular vacationer to Tahoe, has joined in a couple of times.”

To read the full article, click here.

(Source: Finn-Olaf Jones, New York Times Travel)

InConcert Sierra brings renowned pianist Lugansky back to Grass Valley in spring 2016

Leave a comment

World-famous Russian pianist Nikolai Lugansky is returning to perform in Grass Valley on March 13, 2016, thanks to InConcert Sierra.

It is part of a big upcoming season that also includes celebrated violinist Joshua Bell, as previously reported.

“Lugansky enjoyed himself so much while he was here last time,” said InConcert Sierra Executive Director Julie Hardin. “He and Ken played around — sight-reading, four-hands piano literature one day — while Lugansky was practicing on the Grotrian piano at the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

“Nobody was there, and I sure wish I had been. Ken said Lugansky was nearly impossible to keep up with, and Ken had played the four-hands literature before with (Music in the Mountains’ co-founder) Paul Perry numerous times so he knew it pretty well. Lugansky was sight-reading it for the first time.”

Four-hands piano literature refers to music for four hands at one piano. Lugansky last played in Grass Valley in March 2011.

According to his biography, concerto highlights in Lugansky’s forthcoming seasons include the St Petersburg Philharmonic and Philharmonia orchestras (both with Yuri Temirkanov); London Philharmonic Orchestra (with both Vladimir Jurowski and Osmo Vänskä); Philharmoniker Hamburg and Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin (both with Kent Nagano); San Francisco Symphony, and a tour of the United States with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (both with Charles Dutoit).

Lugansky is Artistic Director of the Tambov Rachmaninov Festival and is also a supporter of, and regular performer at, the Rachmaninov Estate and Museum of Ivanovka. He performed the composer’s Piano Concerto No.3 at the closing concert of the inaugural Ivanovka Rachmaninov Festival in June 2014 with the Russian National Orchestra and Mikhail Pletnev.

To read the full article, click here.

(Source: Sierra FoodWineArt; Photo: Nanette Melville)

Pacific Crest Trail featured in popular “Wild” movie

Leave a comment

The Pacific Crest Trail, that traverses part of Nevada County in the Castle Peak area around Donner Summit, is the backdrop of the popular “Wild” movie, based on Portland writer Cheryl Strayed’s memoir. Actors Reese Witherspoon and Laura Dern were nominated for Academy Awards for “Wild.”

Watch a trailer of the film here:

Two men attempt first-ever winter crossing of the Pacific Crest Trail

Leave a comment

Two men are attempting to hike the entire Pacific Crest Trail in the winter which would be a first for the 2,650 mile trail that stretches from Mexico to Canada. The Pacific Crest Trail runs through part of Nevada County in the Sierra Nevada Mountain range.

According to their hiking itinerary, this week they would be traversing the stretch between Bridgeport and Mammoth. Below is an excerpt of their journey courtesy of Jack “Found” Haskel with the Pacific Crest Trail Association.

“Shawn Forry and Justin Lichter are walking the PCT this winter. As you read this they are nearing Lake Tahoe, making their way towards Mexico. They’ve walked so far that the metal on their snowshoes is wearing thin. Soon, they’ll switch to skis.

“I visited with them at an all-you-can eat buffet recently. From frostbite and drenching rain to friendships and stunning and quiet landscapes, their journey is remarkable. And surely, only something that can be reasonably attempted by people as skilled, knowledgeable and experienced as these two. Follow along on their websites shawnforry.com and justinlichter.com.

Here is some of the interview:

As far as you know, has someone done a winter PCT thru-hike before? Do you know about any other long winter trips on the PCT?

Justin: As far as I know nobody has done a winter PCT thru-hike before. Barney Mann mentioned one previous attempt in the ’80s that didn’t turn out well.

Shawn: Short sections of the PCT are hike-able year-round along the PCT. To my knowledge there have been only a few larger sections of the PCT attempted in the winter, namely along the John Muir Trail corridor in the High Sierra and other shorter ski tours through the Cascades. I know of only one other thru-attempt that took place in the 80’s by a husband and wife. My understanding is their attempting ended tragically around the Wrightwood area on their northbound attempt. I think this highlights the seriousness of what we are attempting and the skill that is required in order to even consider an attempt. The margin of error is incredibly small in winter conditions above and beyond the effort is takes to successfully complete a summertime hike of the PCT.

What’s been the biggest surprise?

Justin: I think the biggest surprise has been the weather. I expected a few more sunny days in between storms but they have been pretty much stacked up back to back the entire trip. Another surprise that has been terrific has been the outpouring, support and help from the trail community.

Shawn: Honestly the fact that we are still on trail is a bit of a surprise! I jokingly gave ourselves a 17% chance of success at the beginning of the trip. Without resources to pull from the experiences of others, we have been heading chiefly into the unknown, despite months of planning and years of prior experience. The reality of attempting something for the first time necessitates a lot of flexibility, creative problem-solving along with a bit of determination and stubbornness.

“All joking aside, the thing I am most impressed and surprised by with the trip thus far is the support and encouragement from the trail community. Hands down it has been a highlight. Likely being the only ones on trail this time of year, a lot of focus and attention has been drawn to the trip and so many hikers along the corridor of the trail have come out of the wood work to help in anyway they can. Even just getting an encouraging email has been a game changer given the fact that we have seen literally no one else on the trail. It makes me proud to be a part of the trail community as a whole and you can really feel come interconnected and dedicated we all are over the experience of wilderness.

“The other surprise that comes to mind is how frequent and varied our foot issues have been throughout the entire trip. There have been very few miles without pain or ailment ranging from blisters, trench foot, athlete’s foot and even frostbite. The constant cold and wet had pushed our previous experience in similar conditions to new limits. Once we transition to skiing, I fear a whole new set of foot pains will surely develop.”

Watch a video interview of Shawn Forry and Justin Licther, here:

See all 19 photos and read the entire entry at PCTA.org/blog.

(Source: Jack “Found” Haskel, Pacific Crest Trail Association; Photos: Shawn Forry and Justin Lichter)

Volunteer at the new Donner Memorial State Park

Leave a comment

The Donner Memorial State Park is seeking volunteers for daily operations of the new Visitors Center set to open late spring. In January 2015, the park secured additional financing through the State Parks Fund to complete the new visitors center (read more here).

To visit the Donner Memorial State Park website, click here. To learn more about volunteering in the State Parks, click here. The application to volunteer is here.

(Source: California Department of Parks and Recreation)

How wet will it get this weekend for outdoor enthusiasts?

Leave a comment

By U.S. National Weather Service

Discussion
Mostly cloudy skies across the interior of NorCal early this morning as moisture continues to spread over the area from the west. A few patches of fog are present over portions of the Central Valley and some areas of dense fog are occurring over eastern Shasta County and portions of Plumas County. Temperatures are mild ranging from the mid 30s in the mountain valleys to the 40s elsewhere.

Upper ridge amplifies across the region today and Wednesday as the upstream trough develops off the west coast. This will lift the warm front that’s been draped across the far northern portion of the state further to the north ending the threat of showers for the northern Sacramento Valley and northern mountains. There will be some patches of night and morning valley fog and temperatures will remain mild.

Isolated showers continue over the mountains this evening. A disturbance moving over a flattened ridge may bring an increase in showers to areas north of Red Bluff late tonight and Tuesday morning. We may see some patches of mountain fog overnight and Tuesday morning over the northern mountains. The ridge starts to amplify and push any activity north of Shasta County by the evening. A ridge will remain over the area on Wednesday to keep the area dry and warm with some patchy night and morning fog for the valley.

A stronger system will move into NorCal on Thursday. During the day, the best rain chances will be over the Coast Range and northern interior with some chances of rain mainly staying north of I-80. The main focus through Thursday night looks like it will stay over the northern half of the forecast area, and we may start to see some significant rainfall accumulating. Heavier precipitation is forecast to spread south on Friday.

Extended Discussion (Saturday through Tuesday)
Medium range models showing additional short waves moving through Interior NorCal over the weekend as atmospheric river remains focused over the area. Periods of precipitation likely to continue over the weekend with breezy conditions. Model QPFs continue to differ significantly with oper GFS showing roughly 2 to 4 times the amount of precip of the ECMWF-HiRes. Snow levels look to remain high, above 7000 feet, as forecast area remains on warm side of jet through the weekend. Models point to drier weather early next week as upper ridging returns to Northern California.