California WorldFest returns to Grass Valley July 11-14

Enjoy a weekend of music, culture, dancing, and fun for the whole family at California WorldFest. Photo by Alan Sheckter

Festival goers and music lovers from around the globe will descend upon the Nevada County Fairgrounds July 11-14 for the 23rd annual California WorldFest.

The popular music and arts festival is presented by The Center for the Arts, a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization based out of Grass Valley. With seven stages of music, more than 50 artists from around the world, and a full workshop and educational schedule, WorldFest has set itself apart from other music festivals throughout the region.

Enjoy food, dancing, and cultural music from around the world. Photo by Alan Sheckter

The festival’s extensive offerings include daily yoga, family and kids activities, a variety of educational workshops, and an artisan marketplace.

Bring the kids for some great games on the green, art, music classes, a fun parade around the fairgrounds, and more. Photo by Alan Sheckter

Onsite camping rounds out the true festival – going experience and allows patrons and their families a safe and convenient place to rest before the next day’s goings-on.  RV and tent camping sites are available, and for all the glampers out there, World Fest will have luxury showers available for purchase onsite for the first time this year.

World Fest’s Global Indigenous People’s Village celebrates its 11th anniversary in 2019, offering attendees an immersive journey into the world of indigenous art, culture, and traditions. The village is meant as the ultimate tribute not only to the Nisenan tribes of the region, but to the many diverse cultures by which it is influenced.

Visit the Indigenous Peoples Village for demonstrations, traditional dancing, and more. Photo by Alan Sheckter

Music industry magazine Pollstar calls the California World Fest a “festival of discovery,” while FestForum awarded WorldFest its “Innovation in Music” award in 2016. The Center for the Arts is well known in the local community and across the country for their premiere production capabilities, and World Fest is no exception.

More than 6,000 patrons per day turn California’s most beautiful fairgrounds into a world village where creativity and unity are encouraged, and where some of music’s most ground-breaking artists are welcomed each year.

Dance the night away with some amazing headliners. Photo by Alan Sheckter

“Music brings us together,” said The Center for the Arts’ executive director Amber Jo Manuel. “It helps us understand each other, our differences, and grow to become a stronger community by opening our hearts to the beat and dancing to the music of the world together.”

WorldFest Headliners

Thursday- Turkuaz

 

Drip painting entails actively splashing myriad colors on canvas.

Popularized by Jackson Pollock, Janet Sobel, Max Ernst, and other 20th century luminaries, the artform itself relies on action and motion. In similar fashion, energetic splashes of funk, alternative, rock, R&B, and psychedelia color the music of Turkuaz. Balancing male-female harmonies, strutting guitars, wild horn arrangements, and interminable grooves, this spirit takes shape in the color donned by each respective member on stage nightly via larger-than-life performances.

Friday- Trombone Shorty & New Orleans Avenue

Trombone Shorty’s new album opens with a dirge, but if you think the beloved bandleader, singer, songwriter and horn-blower born Troy Andrews came here to mourn, you got it all wrong. That bit of beautiful New Orleans soul—”Laveau Dirge No. 1,” named after one of the city’s most famous voodoo queens—shows off our host’s roots before Parking Lot Symphony branches out wildly, wonderfully, funkily across 12 diverse cuts. True to its title, this album contains multitudes of sound—from brass band blare and deep-groove funk, to bluesy beauty and hip-hop/pop swagger—and plenty of emotion all anchored, of course, by stellar playing and the idea that, even in the toughest of times, as Andrews says, “Music brings unity.”

Saturday- Toots and the Maytals

Toots is one of the true architects of reggae – so much so that “Do the Reggae,” a 1968 single by Toots and his group, the Maytals, is credited with giving the genre its name. Classic songs written and recorded by Toots and the Maytals have been covered by the likes of the Clash and the Specials, and the group was featured in reggae’s greatest breakthrough event – “The Harder They Come,” the 1972 film that became an international sensation. The all-star guests on TRUE LOVE range from legends like Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Bonnie Raitt to younger stars including No Doubt, the Roots, and Phish’s Trey Anastasio. The caliber of these collaborators reveals the impact that Toots has had on several generations of rockers and rappers, while appearances from reggae icons Bunny Wailer and Marcia Griffiths show the respect granted to the man who might be the music’s greatest living vocalist. At the heart of it all is that voice – drenched in soul, rooted in gospel, and still breathtakingly powerful after almost four decades in the spotlight.

Sunday- Lila Downs

At first glance, it would be easy to misunderstand the exquisite new album by Mexican- American songstress Lila Downs as a collection of traditional boleros. True, Salón Lágrimas y Deseo includes lush readings of such transcendental Mexican classics as Agustín Lara’s “Piensa En Mí” and José Alfredo Jiménez’ “Un Mundo Raro.”

But in typical Lila Downs fashion, the album covers a wide array of musical textures and genres. Going beyond the mournful bolero aesthetic, it is also seeped in political activism and rage at the current state of the world.

For the complete lineup of more than 50 artists from around the world, visit www.worldfest.net/lineup!

Get your tickets HERE